Journey to Justice

Who Will Champion the Rights of Those in Clothing Poverty?

In 2018 Sharewear Clothing Scheme launched Clothing Poverty Awareness Day (9th June) to highlight the hidden issue of clothing poverty in the general population. Today the charity holds a Clothing Poverty Awareness Week to continue the conversation about this under-reported issue. This year’s #CPAW2021 runs from the 7-13th June and Louise Cooke, Founder, CEO and Head of Operations, writes a blog asking us all to consider the everyday impact of clothing poverty.

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Breaking our fall

“Life balances itself on a precarious ledge”[1]. Those of us with assets built through a good education, enterprise or class hand ups can shut our eyes to the ledge. We can delude ourselves we are in control of our lives. But sometimes we misplace our step on the precipice……. For me, my stumble came in my 30s when I lost my home after the breakdown of a long-term relationship. Then 20 years later another one with a second redundancy that went on for 6 months. But I was lucky. I could lean on my assets to cushion my fall; sheltering in a friend’s spare room the first time and drawing on savings the second time.

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Cause and Effect – Differences of the Rich

In my late teenage years, and like many in that age group, I had a taste for worldly literature and an admiration for cynicism. My friends and I were therefore impressed [and reassured] by a reputed exchange between two writers of the early twentieth century, seen by us as the gentle and naïve F. Scott Fitzgerald and the tough and cynical Ernest Hemingway.

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How we talk about protest matters

As a linguist, I care greatly about language – it’s a means by which we shape opinion and convey ideas. In relation to protests and social movements, language is of particular importance; it’s a means by which support is rallied and wants are communicated. Language is also the means by which the public learn about protests and social movements, especially through press coverage, which plays a substantial role in giving protesters a platform to amplify their voices.

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About Food Poverty

Despite being one of the richest economies in the world, the UK has one of the worst food poverty rates in Europe.

A person is said to be living in food poverty when they cannot afford to buy sufficient quantities of nutritious food. Food poverty often means having to skip meals and going hungry, or eating unhealthy foods which lack nutritional value.

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Why your mindset may be a barrier to tackling inequality

We walk through life with a set-up that discriminates against many people while masquerading as an inevitable norm. For somewhere along the line, inequality was built into systems that seek to prevent us from thinking outside this framework of existence where a minority live a luxurious life. We may no longer be ruled by monarchs and their social class, but we have wealthy groups of people who may as well be royalty when we consider how insulated they are from the impacts of poverty.

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How do we create an economically just society?

Helen Barnard, director of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, advises activists: think big, campaign smart and seek the common ground not the high ground.

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Unforgettable memories of US Civil Rights movement veterans

Read these two fascinating articles with US Civil Rights movement veterans by JtoJ volunteer Hannah
Simpson, shedding light on unforgettable experiences and their lasting impact.

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JtoJ on BBC Radio Merseyside

Ngunan Adamu of Radio Merseyside interviewed JtoJ director Carrie on International Women’s Day 2021 about our aims, work and impact.

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Tania Aubeelack speaks to Carrie Supple in Exposure interview

uman Rights Struggles and the Enduring Journey to Justice. JtoJ volunteer and trustee Tania Aubeelack interviews JtoJ director Carrie Supple for Exposure Youth Communications charity – one of our longtime partners.

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JtoJ volunteer pens heartfelt poem and personal tribute to Lauryn Hill

JtoJ volunteer Onycha Walford’s ‘Ballet Blues’ describes a devastating childhood experience of racism.
In her heartfelt tribute to Ms Lauryn Hill, Onycha celebrates the singer’s music and what she represents.

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A Spirit of Resilience

International Women’s Day represents a celebration of progress but also a reminder that change is always possible, even when it seems difficult. It is a story of spirit and resilience, never to be broken down by the effects of gender inequality.

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JtoJ is delighted to announce Sahar Beyad as our new Chair of trustees

Working in PR & Communications for the National Museums Liverpool, Sahar works across the International Slavery Museum, World Museum and the Waterfront Transformation Project. She has a huge passion for the arts, culture and education with over five years of working in the PR industry, and is actively engaged in the fight for social justice and raising awareness on matters of racial injustice, systemic racism and equal rights.

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Help take our human rights exhibition online

All over the country people are hoping for change. Change in what neighbours can do together maybe, or improved services to the community. Or perhaps changes in the law, or for a safer, healthier, more equal world.

Recently, the pandemic, Black Lives Matter and the climate crisis have made us think even more about what kind of society we want to live in.

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JtoJ on France24

Don’t miss this brilliant 10 minute interview on France 24 with Tania Aubeelack, JtoJ trustee talking about our human rights work and its impact – reaching a global audience.

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Martin Luther King speaks – at Newcastle University, 13th November 1967

On this MLK day, Journey to Justice would like to remind you of a wonderful short film made for us by Exposure, an award-winning youth media charity supporting young people to improve their confidence, communication and employability skills. They took part of Dr King’s speech on accepting his honorary degree from Newcastle University. Five months later he was shot dead.

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Watch the recording of our
2020 Human Rights Day event

Watch the recording of our 2020 Human Rights Day event with Janice Kelsey, US civil rights activist from Birmingham, Alabama and JtoJ partners from Birmingham, UK, dedicated to social justice.

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JtoJ wins an Activist Museum Award

The panel’s letter included this feedback. We are delighted and say congratulations to all winners.

“We received a high volume of compelling applications and Journey to Justice’s proposal stood out for the timeliness of its subject and track record of exhibitions that bring activism into museums, as well as a host of other institutions…

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Journey to Justice: Two Birminghams – Human Rights Day, 10th December 2020 Feedback

It was a really inspiring, eclectic evening, bringing people together to unite around shared feelings of hope, resilience and a motivation to push for change – with beautiful music as well. Key themes that arose include the intertwined nature of economic and racial injustice. Speakers shared their individual journeys to justice ranging from marches for freedom in 1960s America, work tackling poverty pay and student action against racism today. JtoJ volunteers talked about our work on civil rights and challenging economic injustice.

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Journey to Justice Annual General Meeting, November 14th 2020 by Zoom

We were delighted with the turnout of members – 35 from Italy, the USA and all over the UK. We welcomed four new trustees: Tania Aubeelack, Veronica Fletcher, Duncan Moore and Rebecca Walker who wowed the audience with their reasons for wanting to become part of the JtoJ team.

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